Star Wars: What do we feel?

Written by Martin Lucas

As a huge Star Wars fan, being immersed in the new films is a true cinema dreamland for me and yet Rogue One crushed that dream a little. I felt I got yanked abruptly out of the Star Wars universe and here’s why: watch Rogue One again, and notice the characters like Tarkin:

wired_how-rogue-one-recreated-grand-moff-tarkin-4.jpg

Now, I’m acutely aware the original actor, Peter Cushing, has passed away and I’m not making light of that; after all, it was Star Wars who decided to create a CGI version of him. The issue here is that feeling cannot be coded; watch this clip and look for the moments of expression on his face. See if you can spot what I mean:

[embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Jw7R4AwSQA[/embed]

It’s like the worst overacting you can imagine, even worse that Smell The Fart acting by Joey from Friends:

[embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Qxkj9JWOWQ[/embed]

Thanks for ruining the movie for me, Star Wars overlords (I am presuming this is Vader’s show still, somehow)! Yes, I’m being picky, so let me get to the point.

Science and Math have not evolved so far that they can mimic consciousness; we are some way off from that but A.I. as part of the big bang that has arrived in technology (AR, VR, IoT, and AI) does make the way we engage and how we engage much more credible. So in short, this is a complete geek article (that’s my excuse) within the context of when technology will be able to replicate feelings in the experiences we create. Not as soon as we think - we should not fear technology - we just need to be aware of what we are creating as feelings when it comes to how we execute said technology.

Until then, the legendary Frank Zappa wins:

The computer can't tell you the emotional story. It can give you the exact mathematical design, but what's missing are the eyebrows